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Arise and Shine Podcast

The purpose of this podcast is to raise awareness of RA/MC and the link there is between ritual abuse and sex trafficking having multi-generational familial origins. The goal is to offer support, the love of Jesus, and hope to survivors AND those still caught in or trying to escape from these organized criminal cultic groups or need rescued out of trafficking. Giving experiential learning and encouragement to survivors who are living with dissociative identity and other behavioral responses caused by childhood trauma, to bring healing to those in recovery in a non-traditional non-religious Christian way because Jesus is about relationship and since those who have had this type of trauma have had such spiritual damage and many have been horrifically hurt by church and the Christian community.  

Arise and Shine Podcast Episodes 

Welcome to Arise and Shine Podcasts Where Pioneers are Braving and Paving the Way for Survivors of RA/MC and Trafficking and Those With Dissociative Identities. Survivors of Trauma Are Individuals With Similar Affects. One Common Thread There is in Recovery is in Finding our Humanity and Connecting in Relationships That are Safe and Healing. 

This is a trailer about the purpose of the Arise and Shine podcast; to raise awareness of RA/MC and the link there is between ritual abuse and sex trafficking having multi-generational familial origins. The goal is to offer support, the love of Jesus, and hope to survivors AND those still caught in or trying to escape from these organized criminal cultic groups or who need rescued out of trafficking. Giving experiential learning and encouragement to survivors who are living with dissociative identity and other behavioral responses caused by childhood sexual abuse as well as trauma based mind control, to bring healing to those in recovery in a non-traditional non-religious Christian way because Jesus is about relationship and since those who have had this type of trauma have had such spiritual damage and many have been horrifically hurt by church and the Christian community.  

Sharri, a survivor with DID focuses on dissociative identity disorder and her recommendation of a film titled "Petals of a Rose" co-written by Holly and Dylan Crumpler. For Dylan's college thesis he wanted to realistically depict a day in the life of a woman with DID since this response has often been inaccurately and negatively portrayed in film and television.  Holly, Dylan’s mother has Dissociative Identity Disorder. She was sexually abused as a child and was not diagnosed until Dylan was an adult. I highly recommend this short film that is the most accurate depiction of DID I have ever personally seen. To view the amazing film, click on Petals of a Rose or check out Dylan's website at www.dylancrumpler.com for more about this film and Dylan. Perhaps he will make a sequel? 

Join Sharri as she discusses and gives the definition of dissociative identity and the response it is caused by extreme, repetitive, physical, sexual, or emotional abuse in the early developmental years that enables a child to survive and continue to function. Previously called multiple personality disorder, DID is characterized by at least two or more distinct personality or identity states (referred to as alters) that take ownership of the host personality’s feelings, thoughts and behaviors. God created our brains with this remarkable coping mechanism to survive horrendous forms of trauma that is too painful for a child to deal with.

Judie and Sharri both survivors with dissociative identities talk about movies on DID like Split, Sybil, and Identity that make DID look like those who have it are dangerous psychotic individuals versus how it really is. Movies like these are simply killer thriller films that depict those with the condition as psychopaths. The two discuss several Youtube films that more accurately describe the condition. Hear some of the truths about why Hollywood portrays survivors as lunatics and the evil behind it all.  

This is a trailer about the purpose of the Arise and Shine podcast; to raise awareness of RA/MC and the link there is between ritual abuse and sex trafficking having multi-generational familial origins. The goal is to offer support, the love of Jesus, and hope to survivors AND those still caught in or trying to escape from these organized criminal cultic groups or who need rescued out of trafficking. Giving experiential learning and encouragement to survivors who are living with dissociative identity and other behavioral responses caused by childhood sexual abuse as well as trauma based mind control, to bring healing to those in recovery in a non-traditional non-religious Christian way because Jesus is about relationship and since those who have had this type of trauma have had such spiritual damage and many have been horrifically hurt by church and the Christian community.  
Sharri, a survivor with DID focuses on dissociative identity disorder and her recommendation of a film titled "Petals of a Rose" co-written by Holly and Dylan Crumpler. For Dylan's college thesis he wanted to realistically depict a day in the life of a woman with DID since this response has often been inaccurately and negatively portrayed in film and television.  Holly, Dylan’s mother has Dissociative Identity Disorder. She was sexually abused as a child and was not diagnosed until Dylan was an adult. I highly recommend this short film that is the most accurate depiction of DID I have ever personally seen. To view the amazing film, click on Petals of a Rose or check out Dylan's website at www.dylancrumpler.com for more about this film and Dylan. Perhaps he will make a sequel? 
Join Sharri as she discusses and gives the definition of dissociative identity and the response it is caused by extreme, repetitive, physical, sexual, or emotional abuse in the early developmental years that enables a child to survive and continue to function. Previously called multiple personality disorder, DID is characterized by at least two or more distinct personality or identity states (referred to as alters) that take ownership of the host personality’s feelings, thoughts and behaviors. God created our brains with this remarkable coping mechanism to survive horrendous forms of trauma that is too painful for a child to deal with.
Judie and Sharri both survivors with dissociative identities talk about movies on DID like Split, Sybil, and Identity that make DID look like those who have it are dangerous psychotic individuals versus how it really is. Movies like these are simply killer thriller films that depict those with the condition as psychopaths. The two discuss several Youtube films that more accurately describe the condition. Hear some of the truths about why Hollywood portrays survivors as lunatics and the evil behind it all.  

Are you a survivor with Dissociative Identities wanting to connect with others in a relationship but struggle with intimacy and trust issues? You're not alone. Any relationship takes time to build and requires being vulnerable and honest. Relationships get more complicated however when there has been abuse. Survivors of abuse can attest to the fact that they need to have safety, space, and understanding as parts of them front and especially during times of triggers or flashbacks. Join survivor Sharri and her husband Frank her biggest support as they discuss some of the struggles that they have encountered in their own 34 year relationship. What can a support person do when a survivor gets triggered? We give helpful advice aboiut what goes on in the brain during these times, how long it takes to come back down off of the fight, flight, freeze response, and give a call to love unconditionally. 

My heart goes out to the community of people who have Dissociative Identities in the wake of the Youtube public video titled “Social Media and the Rise of Self-Diagnosed Dissociative Identity Disorder” by Matthew Robinson and McClean Hospital. A hospital that is supposed to be a place where people can go for treatment of DID has put out this very damaging message and done much harm to restigmatize anyone who has the condition. Matthew Robinson says that he can’t verify or deny who does or does not have DID and he says he doesn’t claim to know anything about the individuals other than what they’ve said on their channel, he then goes on to use their videos as possible examples of people self-diagnosing, fake claiming or malingering which is using their intentional symptoms of being in the sick role for positive gain since one of them had merch for sale.  While the recent removal of the video shows a positive first step towards accountability, I think that further action on their part is needed to be accountable and to make a public apology to the DID community and to those individuals that he targeted and used their social media clips without their permission I might add.  While Robinson’s intention may not have been to harm anyone he has hurt the DID community. Listen as Sharri talks about what he said and her response and empathy for the community of people that she loves.

You know the saying to listen to your gut instinct? As survivors with dissociative disorders we had to disconnect from our gut instinct, our body and emotions to survive the childhood trauma.A child’s drive for attachment is the need to be close to someone to be taken care of. An infant is born in touch with their bodies and emotions and cry for survival and live authentically. Listen as Sharri, survivor of extreme trauma talks about what happens when a child goes through abuse, neglect or is abandoned and the two most painful things that are carried into adulthood and the illustration of 3 year old Jimmy who loses his sense of self and the connection to his emotions because he can’t lose attachment or relationship with his mother.  What is the solution for the parents who have had trauma that gets triggered by their children who get angry or are going through acting out behaviors? Tune in to hear the answer to that question and the two most common underlying emotions that get activated for survivors by present day events. Reconnecting with our feelings can be an overwhelming prospect but hear some ways that work. With compassionate curiosity towards yourself, you too can connect and learn that you already are good enough and be gentle with yourself for being this way in the first place instead of having self judgment or self criticism. It is not a fault or failure that your marvelous brain did what God intended for your mind to do to survive back then. Hear how to start being your authentic self and choose the people you want to be with and those you don’t. 

How do you recover from Trauma Related Dissociation when the whole point of dissociation is to "not know" what trauma and abuse you endure? Join Sharri as she chats about the steps you can take that will support your recovery or that of your client. Recovering from trauma related dissocation after experiencing abuse is a process that requires patience, self care and self compassion. It is a journey that requires intentional effort and a willingness to prioritize your own needs.  Sharri talks about seeking professional help, creating safety and stability, building a support network, identifying triggers, practicing self-care, exploring trauma-specific treatment options, checking out trauma resources, and setting boundaries, so that individuals can work towards healing and regaining control over their lives. It may not be an easy road, but it is possible to reclaim a sense of safety, security, and resilience. 

In this podcast, we explore the profound journey of overcoming guilt, shame, and regret in the recovery process from abuse. These emotions can tightly bind survivors, suffocating their lives and keeping them anchored to the past. It takes immense strength, self-compassion, and the willingness to confront painful emotions head-on. It's important to recognize that these feelings are common responses to trauma and not reflections of personal worth or responsibility. Guilt, shame, and regret are normal emotions that guide us toward what is right under normal circumstances. However, survivors often experience distorted guilt, wrongly blaming themselves for the abuse they endured. Shame can be a powerful jailer, making survivors feel inherently bad rather than recognizing that the abuse was wrong. Regret often arises from questioning past decisions, wondering if something could have been done differently. It's vital to remember that survivors are not responsible for the actions of their abusers. Sharri talks about her journey that includes the hope that she has found through a relationship with Jesus that have helped her replace the lies that she believed as a result of her abuse with the truth. Each individual is unique in their journey. Never preachy, we offer what has worked for us. Through therapy, support networks, and self-reflection survivors can challenge these misplaced emotions and embrace their own innocence and worthiness. This transformative journey allows survivors to reclaim their power, rebuild their lives, and find peace, self-acceptance, and empowerment.

Tune in to an engaging conversation with special guest Cathy Collyer, author of the insightful book, "Staying in the Room: Managing Medical and Dental Care when You Have DID." Join Sharri as she and Cathy explore the unique challenges that Cathy writes about faced by individuals with dissociative identity disorder (DID) in accessing adequate healthcare. Cathy, a survivor with DID herself, shares the strategies and tools she has personally used, while Sharri discusses her own implementation of these tools and techniques. Discover the profound impact of utilizing effective strategies and tools in healthcare, as Cathy emphasizes the wastefulness of poor approaches that consume time, money, and energy. Prepare for an open discussion on sensitive topics such as pelvic and prostate exams, as they explore how survivors can enhance their health and become more effective self-advocates through powerful strategies. What makes this conversation particularly compelling is Cathy's dual perspective as both a healthcare professional familiar with the system's inner workings and a survivor navigating her own path to receiving quality health and dental care.  Don't miss this captivating episode that offers invaluable insights for individuals with DID, therapists, healthcare professionals, and anyone seeking to understand the unique challenges and empowering strategies related to managing medical and dental care in the context of dissociative identity disorder.  Sharri highly recommends getting Cathy's book since it has been an invaluable resource for her the past two years as a survivor with DID. 

You can purchase the book on Amazon.com here:

Staying In The Room: Managing Medical and Dental Care When You Have DID: Collyer, CathyAnn

All survivors of abuse carry shame, however today I wanted to focus on how sexual abuse in particular generates a heightened sense of shame. Sexual abuse inflicts deep emotional, psychological, and physical wounds on its victims and is a profound violation of a person's physical, sexual, emotional and psychological boundaries. It is particularly devastating because it violates their rights, undermines their autonomy, shatters their innocence and is a deep violation of trust and their security. The intimate nature of sexual abuse can cause survivors to feel deeply violated, powerless, and vulnerable. The intrusion into one's intimate and private space can create a deep sense of shame and humiliation, as the survivor's autonomy and control over their body have been forcibly taken away. Sexual abuse targets one of the most personal and private aspects of a person's life- their sexuality; exploiting vulnerablity and involving acts that are typically kept private and for consenting adults. The intrusive and demeaning nature of abuse can evoke a profound sense of humiliation. Join Sharri on Arise and Shine After Abuse Podcast as she talks openly about the power of shame that can keep survivors in a holding pattern and not talk about what happened to them and how she broke free of the grip that shame had on her. You can break the chains of shame too!

In this podcast, survivor Sharri Burggraaf explores a deeply sensitive and highly triggering topic; specifically addressing survivors of ritual abuse and mind control. (If you are a survivor, I want to emphasize the importance of having a support person available while listening, and please remember to practice self-care throughout this episode). Sharri discusses some of her journey and what she has learned about the lies that she was told as she recovered her traumatic memories which included learning the truth about the actual power these groups actually have and how the perception of a child that was terrorized, can cause an adult survivor to then still live by in fear. Although these groups can be dangerous and follow through on their threats to keep from being exposed, they are not as all powerful, all knowing as they claim to be. She delves into the crucial topic of possible ongoing contact with perpetrators and cultic groups and discusses the power they wield over survivors. When a survivor begins recovery and starts to deal with the trauma through therapy, it is highly likely that an insider part could then contact a designated person in the abusing group who will then call out a reporter part to disclose all of what the survivor is doing. Threats and harassments can start to happen in the form of phone calls, emails, letters or cards in an attempt to trigger parts into doing their jobs like to return to the group or obey their rules of silence and loyalty. Join Sharri as she talks about the truth that can be so empowering that she now knows that she shares with other survivors, their supporters and therapists that work with them.

All survivors of abuse carry shame, however today I wanted to focus on how sexual abuse in particular generates a heightened sense of shame. Sexual abuse inflicts deep emotional, psychological, and physical wounds on its victims and is a profound violation of a person's physical, sexual, emotional and psychological boundaries. It is particularly devastating because it violates their rights, undermines their autonomy, shatters their innocence and is a deep violation of trust and their security. The intimate nature of sexual abuse can cause survivors to feel deeply violated, powerless, and vulnerable. The intrusion into one's intimate and private space can create a deep sense of shame and humiliation, as the survivor's autonomy and control over their body have been forcibly taken away. Sexual abuse targets one of the most personal and private aspects of a person's life- their sexuality; exploiting vulnerablity and involving acts that are typically kept private and for consenting adults. The intrusive and demeaning nature of abuse can evoke a profound sense of humiliation. Join Sharri on Arise and Shine After Abuse Podcast as she talks openly about the power of shame that can keep survivors in a holding pattern and not talk about what happened to them and how she broke free of the grip that shame had on her. You can break the chains of shame too!
The parts of a survivor that split off or dissociate into different parts to cope with the overwhelming internal conflict that results as a protective mechanism to having to perpetrate harm to other victims are actually heroes in a person's system. Well, you may think how can they be a hero if they did such harm to other people? They protected the survivor’s heart during the most horrific and unconceivable acts against others because there was no choice for either of them. I want you to hear that again. If you are a survivor I want to talk directly to you. Those parts of you that harmed other victims protected you from having to experience what you were not capable of doing because you have a heart of love and compassion. You might say, but you don’t know what I’ve done. I’m just as evil as my perpetrators. No. That is what they wanted you to believe. But, I’m here to say that I know that if you had actually been given a choice which you weren’t, you would not have decided to harm anyone. Listen as Sharri talks about the abuse of power and control that abuser groups have over survivors that leads to forced perpetration and how survivors can take a different look at themselves than one of self-condemnation and self-hatred.

Join survivor Sharri Burggraaf in this podcast where she talks about the complexities surrounding the term "endogenic dissociative identity" and its impact on the DID and therapeutic community. This podcast critically examines the controversies stemming from the adoption of the term, particularly its origins in the Lunastus Collective, also known as the Plural system. The discussion unfolds, exploring the motivations behind the Plural system's introduction of alternative terms such as “traumagenic” to describe systems with trauma and "ecogenic" as neutral alternatives to describe systems without trauma.

The host delves into the unintended consequences of using non-standardized terminology, emphasizing the potential for confusion among professionals, challenges in accurate diagnosis and treatment, and the risk of divisions within the therapeutic community. The podcast raises ethical considerations, highlighting the importance of clear clinical grounding and adherence to established diagnostic frameworks. The absence of standardized definitions and the potential for misinformation are scrutinized, with an emphasis on the impact on clients' trust and credibility in the therapeutic community.

While acknowledging the Plural System's intentions to provide inclusive language, the podcast critically examines the adoption of endogenic terminology and its lack of recognition in the DSM-5. It discusses the potential harm to clients, the validation of non-evidence-based concepts, and the ethical considerations faced by therapists. The episode concludes by emphasizing the necessity of clear communication, transparency, and a commitment to evidence-based practices in the therapeutic community, particularly when addressing sensitive topics related to trauma and dissociative disorders.

If you are a survivor of abuse you may have been silenced by your perpetrator. Join Sharri in this discussion about how being silenced by a perpetrator can be considered a form of violence causing great psychological and emotional harm although it is not legally categorized as a crime in the traditional sense. With a focus on physical, sexual, and overt abuse the profound impact of being silenced can become overlooked yet the impact is profound. Abusers employ tactics like manipulation, threats, and intimidation to intentionally keep victims silent, causing lasting and recurrent trauma. This perpetuates a destructive cycle, allowing the cycle of abuse to continue for future generations.  Suppressing a person’s voice is a violation of basic human rights and freedom. The terror that abusers instill denies and restricts freedom and is a tool that is used to maintain power and control that perpetuates oppression. As an advocate for myself and others one of my passions is to be a voice for the voiceless and speak up for those who can’t yet speak for themselves and encourage survivors to find and use their voice. As part of the solution we need to first recognize the significance of this powerful form of violence and the harm that is done to be able to create environments that promote empowerment and recovery.   Being silenced profoundly impacts a person's ability to make decisions for themselves and to have control over their own life. When your voice is suppressed, your thoughts dismissed, and your experiences invalidated it’s like being confined to a small, dark room where your perspective and feelings are not acknowledged, validated or respected. In abusive or toxic relationships or situations where silence is enforced, individuals lose the power to shape their own narrative. It's like having the pen taken away in the story of one’s life and their own unique experiences and perspectives are erased, resulting in a story that may not reflect the true essence of who they are.This dynamic robs them of the authority to define their own reality and make choices that align with their own needs, desires, and values. Survivors of abuse will want to hear this podcast to break the silence and go on to take back their power and their voice that was stolen from them.

Shattering the Silence: Empowering Male Survivors with Mike Chapman
Mike Chapman with Polar Life Consulting is a recovery life coach and talks about his journey from his perspective as a male survivor of childhood sexual abuse, sexual assault by clergy at the age of 20, being trafficked and what it is like to be a male survivor. Survivor Sharri Burggraaf chats with Mike about the differences between male and female survivors, the statistics of males being much higher than the 1 in 6 , and about the Compassion Prison Project by Fritzi Horstman who made a video "Step Inside the Circle". 95% of the prison population is male and part of the discussion was on wondering how many of those inmates have also been a victim of abuse.  If you are a male survivor you are not alone. Mike does a great job putting into words what every survivor needs to hear. It wasn't your fault. You are not to blame. This is a must watch podcast. 
Spiritual Walk With Jesus for Survivors of Ritual Abuse and Mind Control 
 
Ritual abuse and mind control trauma survivors Samara Lucero and Sharri Burggraaf chat about challenges there are for survivors with spiritual healing, how the Christian walk is different than what the church may think is correct for them. What does walking with Jesus look like when having multiple identities in one body? Samara shares a bit about her journey from trauma based mind control and accepting Jesus at the age of 5 and how that got her through until the Holy Spirit could help her different identities navigate healing. It did not come without struggles and she wasn't always as close to God's heart as she is now. Samara and Sharri talk about the gaping wound of not knowing that God loves them; Samara shares dreams given to her by God that gave her a look at what she needed, lacked, and what God had for her life. Listen as she tells you the difference between recovery without Jesus and what a difference He has made in her life; going from victim to survivor to thriving and having joy in her life. This is one in the first of a possible series on the spiritual aspects of the satanic assault on children using ritual abuse and mind control as a way to try to get humans starting as young as prenatal to join in the satanic rebellion against God. Sharing about how not all paths go to heaven, these two survivors touch on the difference between Jesus who is the Way to other new age practices that still involve demons and hold no true healing. Hear how challenging it is to follow the normal steps that people take with Christianity and how God takes the parts of survivors with DID on an individual journey with Him that is filled with gentle, patient love.
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